Halusi.nasi/Halluci.nations, an Online Exhibition of New Artworks by The Diving Comedy

New artworks, inspired by nasi (steamed rice). A celebration of happy eating, albeit in different ways. More artworks to come!

Konsep (Artist’s Statement):

Nasi seakan menjadi satu-satunya pilihan bagi sebagian besar warga Indonesia. Karena itu, seri kolase Halusi.nasi mengajak audiensi untuk mempertanyakan “supremasi” nasi yang kita langgengkan: nasi sebagai pilihan utama pengganjal perut (ingat klise “kalau belum makan nasi, saya belum kenyang”?) dan nasi sebagai penanda status (beras masih diasosiasikan dengan tingkat sosial). Halusi.nasi juga mengajak kita menyadari dependensi pada padi mendorong monokultur (kurang baik bagi kelangsungan lingkungan di masa mendatang) dan pentingnya diversifikasi karbohidrat selain nasi, seperti singkong, ubi jalar, suweg, dan sebagainya—semuanya bisa tumbuh di Indonesia.

This is my dream house come true: at the foot of the mountains by the shore. What more can I ask? You are more than welcome to stay for your holiday. PS: Bring your own solar panel to charge your smartphone! . . Halusi.nasi #1: Rumahku di Kaki Gunung di Pesisir (Halluci.nation #1: My House at the Foot of the Mountains by the Shore) Paper collage 21 x 29 cm, dated and signed #HalusinasiHallucination #nasi #rice #beachscape #mountscape #rumahimpian #mountainscape #dreamhouse #surfing #wilujengsurfing #papercollage #collageart #collagestash #analogcollage #cutandpaste #collagecollectiveco #pursuecollagedegree #parody#GastronomyFantasy . . Halusi.nasi/Halluci.nation On a trip to an eastern part of this country, I made an acquaintance with an oma (‘grandmother’). One morning, I visited her shop. She was having breakfast. She told me to join her but said sorry for not preparing nasi (steamed rice). All she had was pisang rebus—boiled plantains—and sambal. It broke my heart. Most of us Indonesians eat nasi for breakfast, lunch, dinner. We often say, "I am not full yet if I haven't eaten rice." Ironically, rice is still associated with how much you can make. For instance, a kilogram of beras (rice) costs around IDR12,000 (approx. USD0.90), while other source of carbs such as cassava (IDR1,000 or not event 10 cents per kilo). I said to her, “Oma, it is fine. I love plantains." She stared at me as she took boiled plantains from a terracotta pot on a wood-fueled stove. “Really?" she asked. Told her, I grew up in a house with a big garden which was more like a plantation of plantains, cassavas, sweet potatoes, yams, and many more. "From the start, I have learned not to eat solely nasi," I said. Hearing this, her eyes lit. Halusi.nasi (Halluci.nation) is a celebration of nasi, albeit in a different way. It invites, if not begs, us to consider other tasty and affordable staple foods other than nasi: cassava, sweet potatos, yams, pulses aka beans, and so on. Halusi.nasi (Halluci.nation) is also about the need to NOT feel hungry when rice is not yet consumed and the need to NOT feel poor when rice is not within budget.

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Climbing a mountain is best done with people you love. You can provide support, advice, and most importantly, food for each other. Anyway, what is your best hiking experience so far? Halusi.nasi #2: Mendaki Setiap Gunung (Halluci.nation #2: Climb Every Mountain) Paper collage 21 x 29 cm, dated and signed #halusinasihallucination #nasi #rice #nasiputih #mountscape #climbing #mendaki #hiking #mountainscape #papercollage #fruitsdemer #collageart #collagestash #analogcollage #cutandpaste #collagecollectiveco #pursuecollagedegree #parody #GastronomyFantasy . . . Halusi.nasi Halluci.nation One cool monsoon, I went to conquer my first “proper” mountain (more than 2,500 meters above sea level) with friends. I was so excited. My friends who organized the trip only required me to bring my own glass, spoon and plate and pay some money for food. When the night fell, we arrived at the campground. The boys built the tents and the girls cooked. After that, we gathered around the paraffin stoves and when the food was distributed, one person squeaked, “Naturally, I expected to eat nasi. I will not feel full if I have not eaten nasi!” As a rice consuming nation, Indonesians eat nasi (steamed rice) for breakfast, lunch and dinner. So it is of no surprise if you hear someone says, “I am not full yet because I haven’t eaten nasi.” But my sweet Lord, at the 2,700 meters above the sea level, this person complained about not having steamed rice! One of the girls said to the person, “Nasi needs more time and fuel to cook. This noodle cooks faster and requires much less fuel. Come and eat. Bon appetit everyone!”. . . Halusi.nasi (Halluci.nation) is a celebration of nasi, albeit in a contrary way. Halusi.nasi (Halluci.nation) invites, if not begs, us to consider other tasty and affordable staple foods other than nasi: cassava, sweet potatos, yams, pulses aka beans, and so on.

A post shared by Sem S. Purba (@theoriginalfin) on

Halusi.nasi #4: Sihir Semilir Pesisir (Halluci.nation #4: Surely Shorely) Paper collage 21 x 29 cm, dated and signed #HalusinasiHallucination #nasi #rice #nasikuning #seascape #superfood #whaleshark #papercollage #collageart #collagestash #analogcollage #cutandpaste #collagecollectiveco #pursuecollagedegree #parody #GastronomyFantasy Halusi.nasi Halluci.nations One monsoon holiday, I noticed R was eating “strange” things: powdered things mixed with hot water. I asked, what those were. R waved three sachets of powdered foods and said, “Mixed grains and nuts, fruits, and vegetables—superfoods!” R gave me some. They tasted good. But why not eat the fresh ones? "But here we are, miles away from Java and the only fresh vegetable available is kangkung and the only fruit is papaya. Hate them!” R replied. Have mixed feelings every time I hear or read about superfoods: these obscure grains can ward off cancers, these lobed leaves can make your skin glow, that waxy fruit juice is a fountain of youth, and so on. Are they that super? Is eating a balanced diet not enough? Why are they that expensive? Are they a mere marketing ploy? Thus I began to reconsider anything I read or hear about foods. For starter, I inquired about nasi aka rice. As a rice-eating nation, Indonesians often say, “I am not full yet if I haven’t eaten rice.” Saya belum kenyang kalau belum makan nasi. Indeed, rice is a staple food in Indonesia, eaten for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Nasi goes well with other foods and, most importantly, it is filling. Perhaps that is the main reason why. But…who invented that “slogan”? Are we really not full if we haven’t eaten rice? Is it a marketing ploy? What do you think? Halusi.nasi (Halluci.nations) is about happy eating. Really. A celebration of nasi, albeit in a contrary way. By highlighting nasi, Halusi.nasi (Halluci.nations) invites us to consider other tasty yet nutritious staple foods, like cassavas, sweet potatos, yams, elephant foot yam or suweg, pulses aka beans, and so on. They can grow well in the rich soil of Indonesia and usually their price per kilogram is lower than rice.

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Beloved landscapes are difficult to forget, aren’t they? Halusi.nasi # 6: Dari Manakah Datangnya Pertolonganku? or Halluci.nation # 6: I Lift Up My Eyes to the Hills, Where does My Help Come from? Paper collage 21 x 29 cm, dated and signed #HalusinasiHallucination #nasimerah #nasibiru #nasi #rice #hiking #thehillsarealive #hillscape #mountscape #landscape #mountainscape #papercollage #collageart #collagestash #analogcollage #cutandpaste #collagecollectiveco #pursuecollagedegree #parody #GastronomyFantasy Soooo, I am having an Anda-belum-beruntung moment. Submitted the #HalusinasiHallucination series to @artjog.id but were deemed unqualified. But I am not sad. Masih ada kesempatan lain. The most important thing for me is to keep on mekarya, making arts and crafts. Uhm, where are my scissor and glue? Halusi.nasi Halluci.nations Halusi.nasi (Halluci.nations) is about happy eating. Really. A celebration of nasi, albeit in a contrary way. By highlighting nasi, Halusi.nasi (Halluci.nations) invites us to consider other tasty yet nutritious staple foods that can grow in the rich soil of Indonesia, like cassavas, sweet potatos, yams, elephant foot yam or suweg, pulses aka beans, and so on. Usually, they cost much less than rice.

A post shared by Sem S. Purba (@theoriginalfin) on

Sunday is olahraga day. Happy Sunday! Halusi.nasi #4: Di Depan, Ada Jalan Panjang dan Gunung-gunung Tantangan Paper or digital collage, dated and signed #HalusinasiHallucination #syukuran #nasi #rice #nasikuning #nasigoreng #nasibiru #nasiuduk #runners #running #hallucinations #halusinasi #papercollage #collageart #analogcollage #cutandpaste #pursuecollagedegree #parody #GastronomyFantasy Halusi.nasi Halluci.nations Seven years ago, when I was visiting Oom Dan in his coastal hometown, one of his neighbors invited me—a stranger—to a syukuran. I thanked him and asked, what he’d celebrate. Smiling, he said, “My wife has just recovered from an illness.” What a reason! That evening, there was a large crowd sitting on the floor, listening to him sharing his stories. After that, he invited us to stand up and say grace. When everyone said amen, the food was already served. Couldn’t believe my eyes: grilled tunas, boiled cassava and corn, stir fried kangkung, sambal ikan…. As I heaped the food on my plate, the host approached me and apologized for not preparing nasi—steamed rice—because local people do not eat nasi regularly. Stunned, I said to him, “Bapak, it’s perfectly fine with me." He shot me a doubtful look. So I told him this: I grew up in a house with a very big garden which was more like a plantation of plantains, cassavas, sweet potatoes, yams. The garden literally fed us. "From the start, I have learned to not eat solely nasi," I said. Most of us Indonesians eat nasi and say "I am not full yet if I haven't eaten rice." Ironically, rice is still associated with how much you can make. Rice usuallly costs more than other sources of carbs. A few years back, the government introduced raskin (‘rice for the poor’). It was widely criticized for discouraging people from consuming rice substitutes—tasty and more affordable staple foods like cassava, yams, dried beans, and so on. Halusi.nasi (Halluci.nations) is a celebration of nasi, albeit in different ways. All in all, Halusi.nasi (Halluci.nations) is about happy eating.

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